Wildlife

Alberta is home to over 500 wildlife species, including amphibians, mammals, birds, reptiles and fish.

To better understand wildlife health, population and movement, a variety of species are monitored across Alberta.

Land use, climate change and ecological responses in the Upper North Saskatchewan and Red Deer River Basins: A scientific assessment

Land use, climate change and ecological responses in the Upper North Saskatchewan and Red Deer River Basins: A scientific assessment   Dan Farr, Colleen Mortimer, Faye Wyatt, Andrew Braid, Charlie Loewen, Craig Emmerton, Simon Slater       The Eastern Slopes of Canada’s Rocky Mountains have been managed for headwater protection, natural resource production, recreation, […]

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Castle Region Scientific Assessment and Synthesis

Ecological Response to Human Activities in Southwestern Alberta: Scientific Assessment and Synthesis   D. Farr, A. Braid, A. Janz, B. Sarchuk, S. Slater, A. Sztaba, D. Barrett, G. Stenhouse, A. Morehouse, and M. Wheatley       This report summarizes the scientific evidence for ecological responses of soil, vegetation, hydrology, and wildlife to human activities […]

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Did you know….

… these five interesting facts about peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus)? Peregrine falcons are the fastest animals on earth. One falcon who was trained to follow human skydivers reached a top speed of 389 km/ hr during a dive. They have the largest natural distribution of any bird – rivalled only by barn owls, ravens and […]

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Barred Owl Monitoring with Lefty

Lefty is a barred owl (Strix varia), which is a species of special concern1 in Alberta. While barred owls are found throughout the province, from the boreal forest to the foothills and Rocky Mountains, they are of particular interest in the Oil Sands region. “These owls are more sensitive to human disturbance,” explains wildlife monitoring […]

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Did you know…

…Undaunted by our spring snowstorms, ferruginous hawks are returning from their winter homes to Alberta. Two sightings have been reported near Medicine Hat in the past couple of weeks. For more information about monitoring species at risk in Alberta, check out our latest updates to the AEMERIS map and data library.

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Better Environment Management Through Monitoring: The Story of the Yellow Rail in the Lower Athabasca

“The approval holder shall provide a plan or participate in the development of a plan for the monitoring and mitigation of the Yellow Rail (Coturnicops noveboracensis) by [given date] to the satisfaction of the Director…” – Approval condition for oil sands mine project The Yellow Rail is a secretive, nocturnal wetland bird. It’s currently listed […]

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